Whitehall Minuet

Here’s the Whitehall Minuet, a tune in three from the Playford collection which dates from the early 1700s.

 

Here are the dots for the tune (PDFs here for the tune, and the tune with ornaments and phrasing):

Whitehall Minuet with ornaments

In the chords, we alternated between a playing a straight three for two bars (1 & 2 & 3 &), and playing a syncopated rhythm for two bars (1 & 2 & 3 &), which looks a bit like this:

WHM chord rhythm

Technically we’re going from a 3/4 feel to a 6/8 feel, giving the tune a bit more movement and forward momentum, maybe verging on feeling a little like a jazz waltz.  We kept it to two bar chunks for the sake of clarity and ensemble but you could experiment with changing the rhythm in different places at home.  Here’s me noodling about with the rhythm:

Tunbridge Beauties

Tunbridge Beauties is a tune from ‘The New Country Dancing Master’ collection by Walsh and Randall from 1711.  It’s been recorded by Boldwood on their fantastic ‘Feet Don’t Fail Me Now’ album.

 

Here are the dots (PDF  here), with a basic version and an ornamented, phrased copy.

Tunbridge Beauties score

 

Below are the basic dots for the groove (PDF  here) that we created to accompany the tune.

Tunbridge Groove

 

Epping Forest

Here are the videos from guest tutor Beth’s class, where she taught Epping Forest, a tune from the 4th edition of Playford’s ‘Dancing Master’ manuscript (1670).  Huge thanks to Beth for covering the session!  Here’s the tune:

 

And here’s the riff:

And here’s the riff for Lord Frog, the tune for which can be found on the old Ealing Session website here:

 

Here are the PDFs for the tune, the tune with bowing, the the tune with bowing and riff and the Riff, with the regular dots below.

epping-forest-with-bowing-and-riff-score-1.png

epping-forest-with-bowing-and-riff-score-2.png

The New Rigged Ship no 2

Not to be confused with any of the Shetland tunes of the same name!  I know this tune from playing in sessions and in trying track down it’s origins I’ve found it listed as ‘The New Rigged Ship no 2’ or ‘The Rigged Ship’ in England where its played as a jig, as ‘The Hills of Glenorchy’ in Scotland where it’s played as a march or quickstep, and as ‘The Wild Hills of Wannie’ in Northumberland where it’s played slowly as an air.  There are numerous other titles for it, and variations of it, and it seems well travelled!  Often a sign of a good tune….

The PDF of the tune, chords and bowing/ornaments variations is here, and the dots are below.  We improvised in the B section by making up our own rhythms for alternating between Es and Bs in bars 9-10 and then between Ds and As in bars 11-12, and then back to to Es and Bs for bars 13-14 before picking up the tune again in the last two bars (aka at the ‘tail’).   ‘Stab’ chords played every two bars helped punctuate the changes here.

The New Rigged Ship no 2

 

Dear Tobacco

This version of ‘Dear Tobacco’ is from the Anne Geddes Gilchrist collection, collected from William Docker in Westmorland, England.  I can’t find a date for it, but John Offord (always a good source of knowledge) says it is “not a polka. Polkas came later in the 1840’s. It is a type of reel which is found in books from the 1700’s. These tunes, with patterns of 4 semi-quavers [written out here as quavers] were only played in Scotland or Northern England”.  This version is also in Dave Townsend’s English Dance Music book, Volume 2.

 

Here are the dots for the tune:

Dear Tobacco

I’ve written out a seperate chord chart below (with an extra Bm chord, apologies!) with an alternative, slightly crunchier version that doesn’t resolve at all.

Dear Tobacco chord chart

I suggest we start with this tune and then go into the Duke of Perth’s reel .  I’ve created a page called Tune Sets where I’ll add PDFs of sets, to make it easier to put everything together.