Arrangements so far!

Captain Lanoe’s/Major Mackie’s:

Hector the Hero harmony and arrangement:

Mairi’s Wedding/Peat Fire Flame arrangment:

Rusty Gully/Pawkie Adam Glen arrangement:

On this Monday (21st) we will look at The Lilting Banshee/May Darling Asleep, Uncle Bernard’s/Grandfather’s, Star Above the Garter and Idbury Hill/Sheriff’s Ride.

Arrangement for Captain Leno’s/Major Mackie

I’ve given you three files here, the first is the complete arrangement of the set in written out instructions. The other two are the compact scores for Captain Leno’s and Major Mackie. I’ve also made a video of the rhythmic variation for the B sections of Major Mackie.

Jock’s Bear Dance (development)

Our last tune of the year, Jock’s Bear Dance, with an added harmony and rhythmic accompaniment. The purpose of the accompaniment is drive the tune, making it feel lively even though it’s not that fast. Here are the dots (with apologies to the whistle players for the low notes! The video below shows a couple of ways the tune, harmony and rhythmic accompaniment can be played to make an arrangement.

We’re finished for this term now, I hope everyone has a great Christmas and New Year. We’ll return on January 10th – whether this is in person or online remains to be seen, we’ll see what the regulations and recommendations are in the new year.

Learning by ear and developing your own practise

I think that learning by ear and remembering the tune go hand in hand – that’s not to say you can’t remember a tune that you’ve learned from the written music, but rather that learning a tune by ear gives you a head start.  Here’s why:

When we learn by ear, we are learning in a way that always us to internalise the tune – we’re not reading or relying on an external source but rather the whole thing is in our heads, at least for a bit, which is to say it’s in our short-term memory.  Internalising the tune is step one in remembering it in the longer term.

From there we need to reinforce and repeat the tune over time to help to move it from our short-term to our long-term memory.  If you dive for the sheet music as soon as it’s available, then you are letting go of that internalisation and you are far less likely to remember it in the longer term. Don’t be afraid to forget the tune.  Seriously.  You probably won’t forget all of it but if you do then you are much better off relearning it from the video or from an audio source – the second time of learning will be much quicker than the first time, the third time will be even quicker again as you strengthen the neural pathways in the brain. 

By all means refer to the music if you need to check a note or to remind yourself of what note the B section starts on but try to avoid cleaving to the dots for fear of forgetting, as you need to partially forget and relearn a tune several times before it’s fully internalised and in your long-term memory.  Building this kind of recall is a process and if a tune isn’t all there, that just means that you’re not done yet. 

Experimenting with the ornamentation and variations that we cover in class is a great way work on tune recall as it demands that you repeat and reinforce the tune many times in a creative and proactive way that really gets you inside the tune and understanding it (internalisation), also allowing you to develop your own way of playing. 

Another benefit of relying on audio sources rather than written music is that you will start to hear the rhythmic and stylistic nuances of the music that simply can’t be expressed effectively in written music.  I often throw in extra elements for the more experienced players to try – the more you listen the more you will hear.  I’m generally unable to create website posts until later in the week, so making your own recordings at key points in class is encouraged!

Folk music by its nature consists of communal ownership of material (a shared repertoire of traditional tunes) and personal agency (individual expression and interpretation).  I try to design exercises and tasks to empower people in both aspects of the genre, but this does demand a proactive, independent approach.  I hope this post makes all of this a bit clearer! 

Stylistic elements and variations

Over the last couple of weeks we’ve also looked at ornamentation and variation elements. The idea here is to look at the broader picture of where these are generally used in order to empower players to use them independently in their playing, rather than giving you a strict model to copy that isn’t as easily disseminated.

  1. Single cuts in between repeated notes.
  2. Adding connecting notes in between notes that are three or four notes apart.

Here is a short video that explains these things, with examples: