Pawkie Adam Glen – developing the tune

In addition to the rhythmic variations we covered last week, there are some nice melodic variations available in this tune. Our first idea was to substitute existing melodic shapes for others in the tune, for example in bars 2, 4 and 8. The second involved substituting a figure that often comes up in 3/2 hornpipes. Have an experiment, try these and the rhythmic variations and find what works for you!

Here is a PDF of the above music:

Exploring Rusty Gulley

On Monday we tried a couple of ideas to vary last week’s tune, the Rusty Gulley. Firstly, rhythmic variation:

What: subdividing notes or tying them together to create longer notes

Where: on repeated notes, on the weaker beats

Here are two videos explaining in further detail:

Subdividing notes
Tying or combining notes

Secondly, melodic variation:

What: transferring existing melodic patterns to other places in the tune

Where: places where there are similar melodic shapes, e.g., scale patterns

Here is a video to explain this a little more:

Finally here are a few examples of the ideas discussed. The emphasis is on experimentation, so see how many combinations you can find!

Grandfather’s Tune/Sheep Shearing

Here’s Grandfather’s Tune, aka Sheep Shearing, a polka from England. It was recorded for the 1941 Voice of the People series by the Dorset Trio.

Here’s the video demo:

Here’s a short video on the triplets and turns that we added to the descending scale patterns in the tune:

Here’s a PDF :

Substitutions!

On Monday we explored the idea of substituting melodic figures for others that appear elsewhere in the tune. Sounds a bit complicated, right?

By melodic figure, I mean a short pattern of notes that makes one particular tune to sound like that particular tune. For instance, in The Big Ship there is a melodic figure at the end of the first bar that we ended up calling a ‘tick’ (because if you were to connect the dots, you would create a tick shape):

This shape also features in its inverted or upside down form, for instance at the beginning of bar 4. We can drop this figure into other places in the tune, as shown below. As you can see, I’ve used both a ‘tick’ (red) and an ‘inverted tick’ (blue) and I’ve just put a couple in in each section, so that it doesn’t get too repetitive.

These substitutions work well because they are similar to the basic version of the tune, follow the same direction as the basic tune and don’t change the harmony, as the extra notes come on the quaver off beats. They will also fit if some people use them and others don’t, allowing substitutors and non-substitutors to play together!

We can also apply this substitution to Reel de Gaspe – since this figures comes at the beginning of bar 4, it won’t sound out of place. Here, the ticks and inverted ticks can be used effectively in the B section.

Some tunes have more opportunities for substitutions than others, but you might want to try this one out on The Buffoon in particular – there are many other instances of this figure popping up in tunes we have learned, with some having more space to experiment than others (if you want a heads up, you could try using it in bars 13-14 of Mount Hills, in bars 10 and 14 of Lollipop Man to name but a couple!).